Sky Cranes

steel silhouetted craines painted

Sky Cranes are a pair of 90″ tall silhouettes in the shape of cargo cranes of the sort that load in older sea ports.

enamel on steel cut to silhouette, shackles, chain; two panels, each: 90″h x 53″w

I created these silhouettes in consideration of the overlapping social, political, and environmental forces that shift how we use and view the waterfronts over time. A working water fronts can represent one important aspect of a thriving coastal city, while recreational use of the waterfront can represent another important use. These are important considerations to weigh with open eyes.

steel silhouetted cranes painted

I first created these pieces for a temporary installation in the Brooklyn Waterfront Artists Coalition in their fabulous civil-war era warehouse space. Now the Sky Cranes have come home to a permanent installation in Boston’s HarborArts. At HarborArts they recapitulate their surroundings, a working waterfront that fosters an overlapping and simultaneous recreational use in exhibiting art and welcoming visitors.

This Is A Long Distance Call

enamel on steel, powder-coated steel silhouette, enamel on plexiglass (pre-existing light window panels)
24″h x 20.25″w x 10.25″d
 

The City of Somerville in conjunction with The Nave gallery launched their Phone Art Box program in 2013 as an on-going public art project to repurpose and transform derelict, empty pay-phone shells. There is no theme specified for this project but recommended concepts to consider included: telecommunication, change, specific neighborhoods, nearby businesses or geography, 21st century, transformation.

The project referenced correlations and connections between contemporary ranching in the Midwest with historic Somerville cattle industry, with an additional wink to the city coming through sneakers tossed over the power lines. The phone lines across the countryside play the role of Ariadne’s thread, connecting intertwined and separate worlds.

photo credit: Mary Miratrix

Instinct to Dream—studio installation

Instinct to Dream is the beginning of a larger installation in progress. It explores a certain wistfulness of gazing up to the changing skies through a neighborhood roof line.

For Somerville Open Studios 2014 I completed three cut-silhouette panels painted obverse and reverse. These panels were hung together with particular attention to their interplay and especially to the shadows cast on the walls and vellum screen panel.

The larger installation, for which this instance is a proof of concept, will have between five and nine panels and additional vellum screens, depending on the exhibition space.

Oil on hardboard cut to silhouette
three panels 40″ x 30″, 29″ x 67″, and 40″ x 45.8″ plus vellum panel 100″ x 32″

Knowing When and The Secret

Knowing When and The Secret

Knowing When, in front; The Secret, behind (obverse painting)
Oil on hardboard cut to silhouette (painted obverse and reverse)
each piece individually: 20″ h x 30″w



Knowing When, in front; The Secret, behind (obverse painting) installed in Mad Oyster Gallery.



The Secret, in front; Knowing When, behind (reverse side painting)



Knowing When,(obverse and reverse sides)



The Secret, (obverse and reverse sides)